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Sequin in a Blue Room | A Dark Erotic Thriller

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Sequin in a Blue Room marks the feature debut of Australian filmmaker Samuel Van Grinsven. Working from an original script penned by Grinsven and Jory Anast, the plot is about a sixteen year old twinky teen known only to the audience as Sequin (played by newcommer Conor Leach). Sequin is his choice of display name on a Grindr-esque hookup app called Anon. He also sports a sequin crop top in all his sexy pictures online, as well as when he goes to meet older men for sex.

When Sequin has an encounter with an alluring stranger (Samuel Barrie) at an anonymous sex party he becomes obsessed with finding this mysterious man. But his deep dive into the sordid corners of these hook-up apps to find this guy puts him in grave danger.

For a first feature Samuel Van Grinsven shows a lot of promise. Sequin in a Blue Room is an intoxicating mix of coming-of-age drama and erotic thriller – two genres that are not easy to marry but for the most Grinsven does a commendable job of blending them together in a gripping fashion.

Sequin boasts a rather unique atmosphere which is quite seductive but there’s also an unshakable feeling of stakes. The plot only occurs over the space of a few days. Sequin hops from bed-to-bed, using a man once for sexual gratification before he blocks them on the app and then moves onto his next sexual conquest. Gay subculture has had a long history with disposable sexual encounters but introducing ghosting into the mix gives Sequin a very modern feel.

But as we see not all of Sequin’s sexual partners appreciate being used and subsequently ignored. Each of Sequin’s sexual encounters is initiated by a title card that reads “Apartment 10, 9, 8” etc. There is a countdown of sorts leading the audience to believe Sequin is heading to a confrontational showdown. It’s a clever subconscious way of building suspense.

Sequin is a very striking looking film. Cinematographers Jay Grant and Carina Burke have a great grasp of composition and lighting. It’s a very grimy looking which feels right at home in a story all about anonymous sex. The scene where Sequin navigates the labyrinth sheeted corridors of the sex party is a standout sequence. The sets are caked in blue neon and coupled with Brent Williams blasting pulsating score makes one feel like you’ve taken a psychedelic trip into a seedy underworld. Samuel Van Grinsven also uses silhouettes and shots from the back Sequin’s head to subtextually show he’s being stalked like the prey. A lot of thought went into how this film looked – every frame carries deeper meaning.

While there is a sense of ever-present danger, the subplot involving Sequin and a fellow gay school mate called Tommy (Simon Croker) counteracts some of the films darker moments with some awkward teenaged humour. This pairing provides levity to a rather sultry story but also helps to anchor the film in reality. Having rather charming adolescent flirty scenes interspersed between a lot of taboo sexual hookups could’ve left the film feeling uneven but Samuel Van Grinsven shows remarkable grasp of his tone.

The only place where subplot feels like a slight detriment is with the finale. The final scene is certainly feel-good cute but it negates a lot the moody tension that made the story so invigorating to watch.

The performances all around are impressive, particularly from it’s young lead Conor Leach who delivers a very measured performance as pretty young thing and emotionally unavailable Sequin. There’s also great work from supporting players like Jeremy Lindsey Taylor as his dad, Ed Wightman as B and Anthony Brandon Wong as the compassionate drag queen Virginia.

Where the film struggles is a lack of nuance in the dialogue – often it’s quite heavy-handed. The scenes in the boys English class practically spoon-feed the subtext to the viewer. Whether it be love, infatuation, obsession or transgression the themes of are essentially spelled out to us. It’s about as subtle as a wrecking ball.

Sequin in a Blue Room will appeal to anyone who enjoys a dark erotic thriller. Fans of Stranger by the Lake, Closet Monster or King Cobra are sure to find Samuel Van Grinsven’s debut equal parts steamy and engaging.

Sequin in a Blue Room is available to rent on Amazon Prime or BFI Player.

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The Batman | Official Trailer 2 – DC Fandome

The Batman is an upcoming American superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. The film is being produced by DC Films and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, and is a reboot of the Batman film franchise. The film is directed by Matt Reeves, who wrote the screenplay with Mattson Tomlin.



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Genre:

Action, Crime, Drama

Release Date:

March 4, 2022

Director:

Matt Reeves

Cast:

Robert Pattinson, Zoë Kravitz, Colin Farrell, Paul Dano, Andy Serkis, Peter Sarsgaard, John Turturro, Jeffrey Wright

Plot Summary:

The Batman is an upcoming American superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. The film is being produced by DC Films and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, and is a reboot of the Batman film franchise. The film is directed by Matt Reeves, who wrote the screenplay with Mattson Tomlin.

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Drama

Mothers of the Revolution – They’ve Challenged World Leaders, Altered The Course Of History And Truly Inspired Millions

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Mothers of the Revolution tells the story of one of the longest protests in history. Between 1981 and 2000, thousands of women from around the world came together at Greenham Common to take a rightful stand against nuclear proliferation. This remarkable group of fearless women were shunned by the press and the media. Director Briar March reveals the women as the cold war heroes they truly were, she tells the story of these women through their eyes and though reenactments as they persisted arrests, condemnation and scorn. 



In the early 1980s, a young mother in Wales was alarmed like many about the UK government’s Campaign called “Protect And Survive”, which advised people to use the four minutes between the warning and a nuclear strike to stack suitcases full of objects like books to absorb the radiation. The Pressure and rising threat to their own families’ safety called for action and thus the Women for Life on Earth group was born.

From the conversation around the kitchen table in Wales, Karmen Thomas took action. She was instrumental in organising the initial protest which on the 5th of September 1981 these women marched from Wales too Berkshire to protest over the nuclear weapons being kept at RAF Greenham Common. Over 120 miles they become a living protest against the British Governments decision. The protest surly gathered momentum as when the reached Greenham Common permanent camps were set up. 

Many women joined the camp such as Chris Drake, a single mother and millworker who truly felt like she belonged and felt like she was born again. Young mothers were not a group who traditionally had their voices heard at the time and the press moved on to other issues they deemed more important, So the women organised Embrace The Base. A day in which the camp and women across the country who travelled up joined hands to form a human chain around the entire military base. 

This documentary is a celebration of Greenham such as its spirit and the effects, which were all worth celebrating. However the film also shows the difficult aspects such as the brutal evictions and assaults by the police force and soldiers. It truly was a Cold War drama/thriller with the tension of a soviet spy novel. It’s also the story of love especially for family and children , and of the commitment these women made to a higher cause. 



They’ve challenged world leaders, altered the course of history and truly inspired millions, it’s an emotional and empowering documentary. 

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Drama

Brother’s Keeper – A Strong Film About Incompetent Adults Failing These Vulnerable Kids

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Yusuf (Samet Yıldız) and his best friend Memo (Nurullah Alaca) are pupils at a boarding school for Kurdish boys, secluded in the mountains of Eastern Anatolia. Both live in the same dorm as it’s a strict and a very repetitive environment, however when Memo falls mysteriously ill, Yusuf is forced to struggle through the bureaucratic obstacles put up by the school’s repressive authorities to try to help his friend. But by the time the adults in charge finally listen and understand the seriousness of Memo’s condition and desperately try to get him to a hospital, the school has been buried under a sudden heavy snowfall. despite the cold and with no way out, they’re desperate tp reach for help. Teachers and pupils engage in a blame game, where grudges, feelings of guilt and hidden secrets emerge. 



Brother’s keeper is truly a study about the power of social realism which is used as a persuasive tool but it’s also about the teacher’s incompetence, responsibility and guilt. It’s a character driven story that has investigative elements to it. 

The Pupils are reminded on how lucky they are to be there, yet it feels more like a relentless institution that’s run like a juvenile detention centre rather then a proper educational school. 

The film remains on the smaller scale and made to feel intimate. The sense of isolation creates this frosty atmosphere where the cold reflects the Icy tension between staff and pupils, the Institute is rather dull and callous but the film does have one running gag where staff members repeatedly slip on the icy floor as each teacher and headmaster enter the sickroom. 

Overall this is a really strong film about incompetent adults failing these vulnerable kids, which made the situation truly bleak. It has some great performances and foreshadows the ending which was so deep that it’ll linger.

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